Guitar Goodies By Brian Turner

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I recommend that you bookmark this page. This page is linked to over 500 pages of handouts I have created over the years. Feel free to use them and share them with friends.

Learning to play a musical instrument is like taking a very long trip. When taking a trip we make plans. We spread out a map and chart out a path that helps us reach our destination. Learning a musical instrument is also like any craft. To do a job well, the craftsman needs the correct tools. This website gives you a map and the tools to reach your destination and hone your craft as a musician.

With this website, you’ll learn the essentials such as scales, chords, and arpeggios. But more than that, you’ll learn how they relate to one another and how they are used to make music. The worksheets on this site are a culmination of Brian Turner’s studies that have resulted from over 30 years of teaching thousands of private guitar students. You’ll learn not only how to play scales, chords, and arpeggios but you’ll learn the theory behind constructing them. For example, after studying the lessons, you’ll understand what the m7b5 in Cm7b5 means. You’ll be able to construct the arpeggio and chord because you’ll understand music theory. What you won’t find is thousands of chords such as you see in chord encyclopedias. Music is a language. To think we can learn a language by simply looking through an encyclopedia in a foreign language is absurd. Scales, chords, and arpeggios like words in any language must be understood in proper context. Also, you won’t find countless scales that you will not use. Instead, you will find the essential scales that you need to be the musician you desire to be.

 

A great place to start

 

My first guitar lesson: This is what I use for the beginners first lesson.

 

How To Play Guitar: a method book for beginners by Brian Turner: Free videos for all of the exercises in the book.


How to practice guitar


Important tips for developing good guitar technique from the beginning


Easy guitar chords and how to use a capo: the seven most common keys for guitar. The capo is explained. if you understand how to use a capo you can play in any key only using these seven basic keys.


Basic guitar chords and chord progressions in the key of C: The seven chords in the key of C also know as the Nashville System.

Learning the notes on the guitar neck: detailed videos and graphics explaining how to learn the notes on the guitar fretboard.

 

Embellishing open chords

After learning the seven basic keys using open chords, the next step is embellishing the same chords. Embellishing is adding a note that is not from the basic triad. A major triad has the 1, 3, and 5 intervals of the major scale. Here we add the 2 (9), 4, and 6 creating the suspended 4, add 9, 6, 7sus, and 9 chords. The exercises in this group of lessons designate the intervals involved only. If you need help with the fingerings visit fingerings for embellished open chords, which is the last link in the group of exercises below.

An example:

 

Key of G and D page 1 of 4

Key of A and E page 2 of 4

Key of C and Em page 3 of 4

Key of Am page 4 of 4

Fingerings for embellished open chords:

 

Movable chords using strings 1-4

After becoming acquainted with basic open chords, we are ready to learn movable chords. Movable chords contain no open notes. Therefore, you can play them anywhere on the neck. Every movable chord can be any chord in the family. For example, If you learn F Major on the fist fret, the same fingering on the second fret is F# Major, the 3rd fret is G Major and so on.
Major chords using the first set of four strings: the fifth and sixth strings are not used in this study.
Minor chords using the first set of four strings.
Dominant seventh chords using the first set of four strings.
Minor seventh chords using the first set of four strings.
Major seventh chords using the first set of four strings:

A methodical system for learning movable barre chords in every key
Major barre chords
Minor barre chords
Dominant 7 barre chords
Minor 7 barre chords
Major 7 Barre chords

Barre chords in the key of C
Guitar Lesson 1: Barre chords in the key of C with the root note on the 6th string
Guitar Lesson 2: Barre chords in the key of C with the root note on the 5th string
Guitar Lesson 3: Barre chords in the key of C with the root note on the 4th string
Guitar Lesson 4: The I, IV, V chord progression using barre chords in the key of C
Guitar Lesson 5: The I, ii, V chord progression using barre chords in the key of C

Triads
Guitar Lesson 1: Introduction to triads
Guitar Lesson 2: Triads using the 1st set of strings in the key of C
Guitar Lesson 3: Chord progressions using the 1st set of triads in the key of C
Guitar Lesson 4: Triads using the 2nd set of strings in the key of C
Guitar Lesson 5: Chord progressions using the 2nd set of triads in the key of C
Guitar Lesson 6: Triads using the 3rd set of strings in the key of C
Guitar Lesson 7: Chord progressions using the 3rd set of strings in the key of C
Guitar Lesson 8: Triads using the 4th set of strings in the key of C
Guitar Lesson 9: Chord progressions using the 4th set of strings in the key of C
Guitar Lesson 10: Review of C triads
Guitar Lesson 11: Review of Dm triads
Guitar Lesson 12: Review of Em triads
Guitar Lesson 13: Review of F triads
Guitar Lesson 14: Review of G triads
Guitar Lesson 15: Review of Am triads
Guitar Lesson 16: Review of Bdim triads
Guitar Lesson 17: Augmented triads (raising the 5th interval a semi-tone to get the #5)
Guitar Lesson 18: Major 6 triads (raising the 5th interval a whole tone to get the 6)
Guitar Lesson 19: Dominant 7 triads (raising the 5th interval 1 1/2 tones to get the b7)
Guitar Lesson 20: Major 7 triads (raising the 5th interval 2 whole tones to get the 7)
Guitar Lesson 21: Major 7 triads (lowering the 1st interval a semi-tone to get a 7)
Guitar Lesson 22: Dominant 7 triads (lowering the 1st interval a whole tone to get a b7)
Guitar Lesson 23: Major 6 triads (lowering the 1st interval 1 1/2 tones to get the 6)
Guitar Lesson 24: Combining voicing of the C Major 7 triads
Guitar Lesson 25: Combining voicings of the Dominant 7 triads
Guitar Lesson 26: Combining voicings of the Major 6 triads

Harmonized scales

Harmonized scales are triads constructed by stacking the intervals of the scale in thirds. Below we have all 12 keys using set 1 (1,2, and 3 strings) and set 2 (2,3, and 4 strings).

1 harmonized-scales-c

2 harmonized-scales-g

3 harmonized-scales-d

4 harmonized-scales-a

5 harmonized-scales-e

6 harmonized-scales-b

7 harmonized-scales-f#

8 harmonized-scales-c#

9 harmonized-scales-Ab

10 harmonized-scales-eb

11  harmonized-scales-Bb

12 harmonized-scales-f

harmonized scales all 13 pages in pdf.

Double stops
Double stops (harmony in 3rds and 6ths) are parts of the harmonized scale as illustrated in the video below.

 

 

Inversions or voicings of triads
There ar five voicings of triads:
major, minor, augmented, diminished, and suspended 4.

Triads: 16 ways to make each major, minor, or dominant seventh chord.
The three pdfs below are 12 pages each.

Major triads:
Minor triads
Dominant seventh triads

Essential guitar chords for jazz
Guitar Lesson 1: Essential guitar chords for Jazz part 1
Guitar Lesson 2: Essential guitar chords for Jazz part 2
Guitar Lesson 3: Essential guitar chords for Jazz part 3
Guitar Lesson 4: Essential guitar chords for Jazz part 4
Guitar Lesson 5: Essential guitar chords for Jazz part 5 (You need the Sibelius Scorch plug in for this link. Use the pdf below if you do not have it.)
Guitar Lesson 5: Essential guitar chords for Jazz part 5 (pdf)

Diminished chords
Guitar Lesson 6: How to use the diminished 7 chord

Chord comping blues and jazz in the key of G      
Guitar Lesson 7: Chords that function as G7
Guitar Lesson 8: Chords that function as C7

Guitar Lesson 9 Chords that function as D7
Guitar Lesson 10: 12 bar blues in G using essential dominant 7 and dominant 9 chords

The Nashville chord system
Fourteen fundamental chords in all twelve keys.

If you raise the 5th interval of a triad chromatically other chords are created. Bringing the 5 up one semitone creates a augmented chord. Bring it up another semitone and you have the 6 chord. Bring it up again, and you have Dominant 7. Once more and you have a Major 7 chord.

If you lower the root note of a triad chromatically other chords are created. Bringing the root down one semitone creates a Major 7 chord. Bring it down another semitone and you have the dominant 7 chord. Bring it down again, and you have the 6 chord. Check it out:

Coloring chords:
Coloring chords can be achieved by raising the 5 or lowering the root.

All About Chords:
A variety of chord studies I use to teach students chords. They help you to put chords in context so you understand how they relate to each other.

The I IV V and I vi IV V chord progression using barre chords

Rhythm changes or the I vi ii V is used in jazz more than any other chord progression.

Arpeggios: There are five types of 7 chords: Major 7, Dominant 7, Minor 7, Diminished 7, and Half Diminished 7.

Chord Infrastructure

Scales
Blues scales: five boxes (also known as patterns, shapes, or fingerings) in the key of Am and Em. The five boxes will enable you to play the blues scale any where on the neck of the guitar.
Videos of the blues scale in the key of Em. All five boxes are explained. Horizontal an vertical fragments are also illustrated.
Blues and rock riffs in the key of Em
Blues and rock riffs in the key of Am
Blues and major pentatonic scales every key
Blues scale in the key of G, box 1 and fragments

Learn to play the Texas blues using all five boxes of the blues scale from the previous exercises:

Texas blues 1
Texas blues 2
Texas blues 3
Texas blues 4
Texas blues 5
Texas blues 6
Texas blues 7
Texas blues 8

Blues riffs from Dr. Briantine’s Method: excerpts from my first book Dr. Brianstine’s Guitar Method.

Diatonic modes (scales) in all every key
Diatonic scales (modes in the key of C and G)
Modes, scales, and chords: It is essential to understand how these elements relate to each other.
Scales: The Johnny Smith Approach

Associating chords with scales and arpeggios
Roots on the 6th string

Guitar Lesson 1: Introduction
Guitar Lesson 2: The major chord, scale, and arpeggio with the root on the 6th string
Guitar Lesson 3: The minor chord, scales, and arpeggio with the root on the 6th string
Guitar Lesson 4: The dominant 7 chord, scale, and arpeggio with the root on the 6th string
Guitar Lesson 5: The major 7 chord and arpeggio with the root on the 6th string
Guitar Lesson 6: The minor 7 chord and arpeggio with the root on the 6th string
Guitar Lesson 7: The major 6 chord and arpeggio with the root on the 6th string
Guitar Lesson 8: The minor 6 chord and arpeggio with the root on the 6th string
Guitar Lesson 9: The augmented chord and arpeggio with the root on the 6th string
Guitar Lesson 10: The diminished 7 chord and arpeggio with the root on the 6th string
Guitar Lesson 11: The half diminished chord and arpeggio with the root on the 6th string
Guitar Lesson 12: The dominant 9 chord and arpeggio with the root on the 6th string
Guitar Lesson 13: The dominant 7#9 chord and arpeggio with the root on the 6th string
Guitar Lesson 14: The dominant 7b9 chord and arpeggio with the root on the 6th string
Guitar Lesson 15: The dominant 13 chord and arpeggio with the root on the 6th string
Guitar Lesson 16: The sus 4, sus 2, and add 9 chords with the root on the 6th string

Roots on the 5th string
Guitar Lesson 17: The major chord, scale, and arpeggio with the root on the 5th string
Guitar Lesson 18: The minor chord, scale, and arpeggio with the root on the 5th string
Guitar Lesson 19: The dominant 7 chord, scale, and arpeggio with the root on the 5th string
Guitar Lesson 20: The major 7 chord and arpeggio with the root on the 5th string
Guitar Lesson 21: The minor 7chord and arpeggio with the root on the 5th string
Guitar Lesson 22: The major 6 chord and arpeggio with the root on the 5th string
Guitar Lesson 23: The minor 6 chord and arpeggio with the root on the 5th string
Guitar Lesson 24: The augmented chord and arpeggio with the root on the 5th string
Guitar Lesson 25: The diminished 7 chord and arpeggio with the root on the 5th string
Guitar Lesson 26: The half diminished chord and arpeggio with the root on the 5th string
Guitar Lesson 27: The dominant 9 chord and arpeggio with the root on the 5th string
Guitar Lesson 28: The dominant 7#9 chord and arpeggio with the root on the 5th string
Guitar Lesson 29: The dominant 7b9 chord and arpeggio with the root on the 5th string
Guitar Lesson 30: The dominant 13 chord and arpeggio with the root on the 5th string
Guitar Lesson 31: The sus 4, sus 2, and add 9 chords with the root on the 6th string

 

Two bar blues intros or kickoffs in the key of G and A

12 bar blues in the key of G using essential chords. Use the backing track to play along. The two bar intro is not on the PDF. Just play the D7 chord on the two bar intro.

Blues Tools in the key of G

Backing Tracks

How to Improvise on Guitar

The Mighty Intervals:
Understanding intervals is absolutely essential for mastering the guitar. This study will help you understand intervals and the art of improvisation.

Chords and interval maps in all twelve keys

The Vibe of Jimi Hendrix: Chords and riffs in the style of Jimi classics such as Little Wing and The Wind Cries Mary.

The Vibe of Charlie Christian: Charlie played with Benny Goodman in the 1930’s. Charlie and Django Reinhardt are considered by most to be the most influential jazz guitarists of all time. Herb Ellis said, “Every guitarist is influenced by Charlie whether they know it or not”.

Quartal harmony for guitar

Open G Tuning For Guitar
What does Robert Johnson, Jimmy Page, Keith Richards, Leo Kottke, Michael Hedges, The Black Crowes, The Moody Blues,  and most of the acoustic blues players from the Mississippi delta have in common? Open G Tuning

SONGS

More songs

Christmas Songs

Resources
Becoming a Guitarist: Evolution of Resources Since the 1960s
Guitar Method Reviews

Cycle of 5ths part 1
Cycle of 5ths part 2

Bass guitar lessons

Dobro and steel guitar lesson

Puerto Rican cuatro

Mandolin

 Phone 281-354-4456
Business hours are from 10:00 a.m. to 10:00 p.m.

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